Updates and Vanderbilt CRS


One of Our Own at Vanderbilt CRS Gets Recognized

CAB chair Alberta Hardison received the 2019 Brother's and Sister's United (BASU) Legacy Award. Alberta has dedicated over 10 years of volunteer service and support to Nashville Black Pride.

Alberta Hardison
Alberta Hardison

 “My volunteer work with the Vanderbilt HIV Vaccine program started because I wanted to do something more. I saw a video on my local news station in 1998. I called and started in a trial. I was in the canarypox trial where I received the vaccine, which made me have VISP1. I often talk to people about how much HIV has changed within the last 20 years in Nashville. When I started volunteering, African Americans were not as willing to be a part of the trials or talk about HIV, especially in the South. This has changed a lot and I have worked hard to be out in the community to help educate and let people know about HIV vaccine research.”

This year the Rev. Edwin C. Sanders II Service Award was awarded to Dwayne Jenkins, Director of MyHouse Nashville. Thank you, Dwayne, for your outstanding support and contributions in ending the epidemic! We couldn't have found a more deserving person to honor this year. The award was presented at our World AIDS Day event, which featured Gail Broder as the keynote speaker.

Pictured L-R: Keith Richardson (Vanderbilt CRS), Shonda Sumner (Vanderbilt CRS), Dwayne Jenkins , Gail Broder (HVTN Core), Jarissa Greenard (Vanderbilt CRS), Amanda Langlois (Vanderbilt CRS).

Pictured L-R: Keith Richardson (Vanderbilt CRS), Shonda Sumner (Vanderbilt CRS), Dwayne Jenkins , Gail Broder (HVTN Core), Jarissa Greenard (Vanderbilt CRS), Amanda Langlois (Vanderbilt CRS).

Congratulations to our CAB Chair, Alberta Hardison, on receiving recognition for her 10-year working relationship with Brother’s United Network, Inc. We appreciate your partnership and efforts to reach our community!

Pictured L-R: Keith Richardson (Vanderbilt CRS), Shonda Sumner (Vanderbilt CRS), Dwayne Jenkins , Gail Broder (HVTN Core), Jarissa Greenard (Vanderbilt CRS), Amanda Langlois (Vanderbilt CRS).

Pictured: Keith Richardson (Vanderbilt CRS), Alberta Hardison (Vanderbilt CRS CAB Chair), Jarissa Greenard (Vanderbilt CRS).

Vanderbilt CRS Welcomes New Team Member

Amber Massey
Amber Massey

The Vanderbilt HIV Vaccine Program welcomes our new Research Nurse Specialist Amber Massey. Amber is a graduate of the University of Memphis where she earned her Bachelors of Science in Nursing degree in 2015. Since then, she has worked as a Registered Nurse at Vanderbilt University Medical Center for 4 years. Amber transitioned into her new role as Research Nurse Specialist at the beginning of 2020. Her previous experience has been with cardiology, but Amber found a passion to help in HIV vaccine research and we are thrilled to have her a part of the team. Amber has two children and 2 stepchildren with her husband, who is also a VUMC nurse. “I am so excited to be a part of the team, and I feel like the work you guys (and now, I) do is a way to really make a difference.”

1- VISP is an acronym that stands for Vaccine-Induced SeroPositivity. Antibodies help to prevent infection. Most vaccines cause the body to make antibodies. If you get an HIV vaccine, your body may make antibodies to HIV. However, standard HIV tests search for HIV antibodies,  a sign of HIV infection for people who have not previously received an HIV vaccine. If you get a standard HIV test after receiving an HIV vaccine, your HIV test results could come back positive even if you are not infected with HIV. This is called a VISP test result.